Event Cancellation–Crossings: Words and Music

The Sunday Best Reading Series regrets that it must cancel Crossings: Words and Music, which was scheduled for Friday, November 2, at 7:30 in The Lounge at Hudson View Gardens. We were very excited about this event, which was to be co-sponsored with the HVG Performing Arts Group, and are disappointed that we must cancel. However, we hope to reschedule. Our thoughts are with all those affected by Sandy as the city gets back on its feet.

Advertisements
Published in: on October 31, 2012 at 4:42 pm  Leave a Comment  

Crossings: Words and Music — Who’s Who

Rika Lesser, poet, translator, essayist, and educator, is the author most recently of Questions of Love: New & Selected Poems and a revised edition of Etruscan Things. She has translated fifteen collections of poetry or fiction for readers of all ages, primarily from Swedish and German, including works by Göran Sonnevi, Gunnar Ekelöf, and Claes Andersson from Swedish, and Rafik Schami, Rainer Maria Rilke, and Hermann Hesse from German as well as Kiki Dimoula from Greek, her first translation in that language. Her honors include the Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship, an Ingram- Merrill Foundation Award in Poetry, The Landon Poetry Translation Prize, a Fulbright Commission fellowship, two NEA Translation Grants (2001 and 2013), and two Translation Prizes from the Swedish Academy.

Kiki Dimoula is a member of the Academy of Athens. She has been awarded the Greek State Prize twice, the Grand State Prize, the Ouranis Prize, and the Aristeion of Letters (given by the Academy of Athens), as well as the European Prize for Literature. Her poetry has been translated into English, French, Danish, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, and many other languages. Rika Lesser’s translation with Cecile Inglessis Margellos of The Brazen Plagiarist: Selected Poems comes out as a Margellos World Republic of Letters Book from Yale University Press on November 13, 2012.

********

Aaron Jay Kernis, winner of the coveted 2002 Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition and one of the youngest composers ever awarded the Pulitzer Prize, has taught composition at the Yale School of Music since 2003. Among the most esteemed musical figures of his generation, his music is featured prominently on orchestral, chamber, and recital programs worldwide and he has been commissioned by many of America‘s foremost performing artists. He was invited to join the American Academy of Arts and Letters as a member in 2011 and is the most recent winner of the Nemmers Prize from Northwestern University.

Filippo Tommaso Emilio Marinetti (1876-1944) was an Italian poet and the founder of the Futurist movement.  He is best known as the author of the Futurist Manifesto (1909), which was published in French on the front page of the most prestigious French daily newspaper, Le Figaro. Marinetti believed that violence was a means of producing an aesthetic effect, as well as inherent to life itself. Consequently, Futurism had both anarchist and Fascist elements.First published in 1932, The Futurist Cookbook is a collection of essays, exhortations, scenarios, and recipes for food of the future which related the artistic movement of Futurism to food and challenged the conventions of nineteenth-century Italian fare.

Asta Hansen has worked in film, television and theatre on both coasts and abroad. Recent highlights are the role of Winnie in Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days, John Jesurun’s Stopped Bridge of Dreams at La Mama and in his webisode Shadowland, and lead role in Spotless which was selected for the Poppy Jasper Film Festival in Northern California.

Violinist Nurit Pacht has enjoyed a career as a chamber musician performing in festivals worldwide. As a recitalist and in concerto appearances, she has performed in venues such as London’s Wigmore Hall, Vienna’s Musikverein, Moscow’s Great Hall, Washington’s Kennedy Center, Carnegie’s Weill Hall, The People’s Hall of China in Beijing and, at the invitation of Christoph Eschenbach, at Ravinia’s Rising Stars Series. Chosen by director Robert Wilson to be the featured musician in his multi-media piece “Relative Light” featuring solo violin works by John Cage and J.S. Bach, Ms. Pacht is equally at home in both standard and contemporary repertoire. Her passion for new music has culminated in world premiers and commissions from composers including Michael Hersch, Noam Sheriff and Annie Gosfield. She has performed in duo recitals with Philip Glass playing the composer’s works for violin and piano.

Cellist David Bakamjian performs regularly as a recitalist, chamber player, and recording artist. He  has soloed with numerous orchestras on both baroque and modern cello, and has served as principal cellist for many others. With the Casa Verde Trio, Mr. Bakamjian completed six critically acclaimed national tours as well as a month-long tour of China. On baroque cello, he performs with Brooklyn Baroque, the American Classical Orchestra, Early Music New York, Concert Royal, and the Long Island Baroque Ensemble. He co-wrote and is featured in “Evocations of Armenia,” a program for solo cello and spoken word that was specially conceived for the MET museum. His CD of Boismortier cello sonatas was released last year.

Pianist Evelyne Luest is an accomplished soloist and chamber musician and has performed and toured in Europe, South America, Asia and the USA. She has won several competitions including the Artists International Competition in New York as soloist as well as many awards with her ensemble, Contrasts Quartet. Ms. Luest has performed as soloist at Carnegie Hall, the Spoleto Festival of Two Worlds in Italy and on the St. Paul Sunday National Radio Show. Her many collaborations include such noted musicians as cellist Truls Mork and flutist Emmanuel Pahud. Recent performances include festivals and concert venues in Norway, France, Japan, Spain, Albuquerque, and Detroit. Her long list of premieres includes compositions by Ned Rorem, Joan Tower and Aaron Jay Kernis. Ms. Luest studied with Gilbert Kalish at SUNY/Stony Brook, where she received an M.M. and D.M.A. in piano performance.

Event Announcement: Crossings–Words and Music, Friday, November 2nd at 7:30 pm

Sunday Best Reading Series in partnership with Sunday Concerts in the Lounge present Crossings: an Evening of Words and Music. On November 2nd at 7:30 in The Lounge @ HVG, Rika Lesser, poet, will read from her translation of The Brazen Plagiarist by Kiki Dimoula. Composer Aaron Jay Kernis‘s “The Four Seasons of Futurist Cuisine,” based on Marinetti’s Futurist Cookbook, will be performed by Asta Hansen Nelson, narration; Evelyne Luest, piano; Nurit Pacht, violin; and David Bekamjian, cello.  The suggestion donation of $10 includes a reception with free snacks and a cash bar.

The Lounge is at Pinehurst Avenue and 183rd St., in Northern Manhattan. Take the A train to 181st Street.

From the Department of Other Venues

Sunday Best’s official photographer Bonnie Walker is going to be reading from a memoir-in-progress at the Cornelia Street Cafe as part of the Greek American Writers Series hosted by the amazing poet, Dean Kostos. Saturday, October 20, at 6 PM–Admission is $8, which includes a drink. Davidson Garret, Christi Shannon, and Yolanda Koumidou Vlesmas will also be reading.

Published in: on October 16, 2012 at 9:23 am  Leave a Comment  

Event Recap: Crossing the Atlantic

In the United States, April 15 usually means tax day. (Perhaps T.S. Eliot had a point when he wrote that April is the cruelest month!) But this year, on April 15, the Sunday Best Reading Series took some of the pain out of tax day with “Crossing the Atlantic: Poets British and American.”  The afternoon’s program featured writers with ties to both sides of the pond: Anne-Marie Fyfe, a poet born in Northern Ireland who now lives and works in London; American poet Chris Hansen-Nelson, a long-time resident of Washington Heights; and poet Cheryl Moskowitz, who was born in Chicago but has lived in the UK since she was 11 years old.  Read on for a recap of the reading with links to more photos and an audio of the event, which was broadcast on WHFR (Washington Heights Free Radio) on April 18.

From left to right: Anne-Marie Fyfe, Cheryl Moskowitz, and Chris Hansen-Nelson

Anne-Marie Fyfe kicked off the afternoon’s event with a series of poems on the theme of travel.  With the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic just past, Anne-Marie began with the story of her grandfather, one of the builders of the legendary ocean liner, who avoided joining in the ship’s doomed maiden voyage by eloping with her grandmother. Although her grandfather seemingly cheated fate, he and Anne-Marie’s grandmother nevertheless both died young.  Anne-Marie began her set with a poem that attempts to redress the tragedy of her grandparents by allowing them both to grow old.  The work she read repeatedly returned to the narrative device of the journey, telling of train trips across America and airplane flights on September 11.

Poet Anne-Marie Fyfe

Northern Manhattan’s own Chris Hansen-Nelson presented a selection of new work that represents an experiment in narrative poetry. These poems were all written in the persona of Jim Casy, the preacher Casy from The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck’s landmark American realist novel about poverty and the struggle to survive in the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression.

Writer Chris Hansen-Nelson

Poet Cheryl Moskowitz closed the afternoon’s program with readings from her most recent book The Girl is Smiling, which takes the past seven years of Cheryl’s life as its primary material. Cheryl explained that much of the poetry deals with the definition of things and with the nature of absence and presence. One of the poems Cheryl read, “The Visit,” deals with her recent reunion with her father who suffers from Alzheimer’s Disease. For many years, her father was an “absent presence” in her life, and now she is getting to know him just as he is in the process of forgetting who he is.

Poet Cheryl Moskowitz

At the close of the event, Sunday Best curator gave special thanks to our poetry consultant Martin Mitchell, who was instrumental in getting both Anne-Marie and Cheryl on the afternoon’s program.

Sunday Best poetry consultant Martin Mitchell at the after-reception

Following the event, the artists and the audience members enjoyed drinks and snacks at our traditional after-reception.

Poet Anne-Marie Fyfe talking to an audience member at the after-reception

As always, the Sunday Best Reading Series thanks the efforts of its volunteers, whose efforts and dedication are crucial to the series’ success.

Sunday Best comptroller and bartender Peter Martin.

This event was recorded for WHFR, Northern Manhattan’s own internet radio station. You can access the audio here. Podcasts of previous Sunday Best events are available on our program page on WHFR’s site.

For more photographs from this event, please visit Sunday Best’s Flickr page, which is accessible at this link or by clicking on the photos displayed in the sidebar to this blog.

Event Announcement: Depends What You Mean by Haunted, October 14, at 4PM

Please join the Sunday Best Reading Series on Sunday, October 14, for  “Depends What You Mean by Haunted,” * an afternoon of prose readings featuring writers Julia Rust, David Surface, and Gay Partington Terry.  As always, the event will take place at 4PM in The Lounge at Hudson View Gardens (Pinehurst Avenue at West 183rd Street), and your suggested contribution of $7 will cover admission to the reading as well as drinks and snacks at the reception following the event, during which you will have an opportunity to meet and mingle with the writers.

Please read on for bios of the writers who will be sharing their work on October 14.

Writer Julia Rust

Julia Rust is a writer, actor and graphic designer living in Sleepy Hollow, NY. Her short fiction can be found in print and in online literary journals, including The Cortland Review, The Blue Penny Quarterly, and Many Mountains Moving, and has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She has co-authored a collection of prose collaborations with David Surface called The Secret Life of Gods.

Writer David Surface

David Surface’s stories and essays have been published in North American Review, Fiction, DoubleTake, Crazyhorse, Cortland Review, Taitlin’s Tower, Supernatural Tales, and Shadows and Tall Trees. He has twice been nominated for the Pushcart Prize in Fiction, was the recipient of a 2008 Fellowship in Creative Nonfiction from the New York Foundation for the Arts, and was one of six artists statewide nominated for the NYFA Prize. He is the founder and director of the Veterans Writing Workshop that runs free programs for U.S. veterans in the NYC area and is also founder of the FEGS Writing Project that provides workshops for adults living with mental illness and substance abuse.

Writer Gay Partington Terry

Gay Partington Terry is a Manx insomniac who grew up in northern Appalachia and now lives in Harlem. As a teenager, she assisted her father in his magic act and since then has worked as a waitress, factory worker, and welfare worker; catalogued tribal arts for Sotheby’s; volunteered in Margaret Mead’s office before she died; and taught tai chi and yoga. She has had poetry and short stories published in e-zines, fantasy magazines, and anthologies and wrote screenplays for “The Toxic Avenger” II and III. She has four grandchildren and is watched over by the ghost of a loyal Australian Shepherd. At heart, she thinks of herself as a slacker who enjoys teaching her grandkids “weird stuff.”

*“Depends what you mean by haunted” is a line from “The Professor of History,” by David Surface

%d bloggers like this: